Finding the right tenant for your property is an important process to go through. Ultimately, you’re entering into a long-term contract with a stranger, so it’s key to have ready a number of questions to ask prospective tenants.

The first step is to ensure that you, as the landlord, meet potential tenants for the property viewing. That way you get to spend a little time together and can ask your questions in a natural way. What both tenant and landlord need and want is a happy let that runs smoothly. Beginning the relationship with a face-to-face meeting gets you off on the right foot.

Follow our guide with six questions to ask prospective tenants to get all the answers you need before making the commitment.

1. Will anyone else be living in the property with you?

Important to know because any other tenants will need to be named on the tenancy. Anyone renting your property and named on the tenancy are equally liable for rent and other responsibilities.

2. Why are you looking to rent?

You’ll hopefully learn a lot about your tenant with their response to this question. What it will give you is a real flavour for their background, their current situation and where they’re heading. This will help you gauge their intentions.

3. What kind of relationship do you have with your current landlord?

This question is digging for any hint of issues with landlords currently, or in the past. Take note of not only the verbal responses, but also body language. If your prospective tenant has nothing to hide then they’ll be open, otherwise, there may be certain things you can pick up on.

4. Have you ever left a property on bad terms or been evicted?

It’s vital that the answer given here is a ‘no’ without hesitation. Entering into a contract with someone who has a track record of difficulties with a landlord, especially if they’ve been evicted, isn’t a great idea.

4. Have you ever left a property on bad terms or been evicted?

It’s vital that the answer given here is a ‘no’ without hesitation. Entering into a contract with someone who has a track record of difficulties with a landlord, especially if they’ve been evicted, isn’t a great idea.

5. Do you have pets?

Extremely important to ask if you have a no pets policy for your property. The UK is a nation of animal-lovers and many who may not have a pet now could be considering getting one in the future. If you don’t accept pets, make that completely clear from the outset. That way you leave no grey areas.

6. What’s your employment status?

Not only will this be highly practical information for you to discover, but it will also dig a little deeper into the way in which your tenant lives their life. Working unsociable hours could create issues for other tenants or very close neighbours. Establishing what they do means you can avoid receiving noise complaints. A work-from-home musician with a full drum kit in tow is probably out of the question, then!

In all seriousness, though, you may need to investigate further if your prospective tenant works from home. This may create additional wear and tear, but on the other hand, it could mean the property is kept in good condition. Only by asking the correct questions can you gauge the personalities of your potential tenants.

Of course, you’ll use your own style of communication when asking these questions so you may want to rephrase them so they feel natural to you. Gathering these answers will mean you’re best placed to offer the tenancy to the most suitable candidates.

You can list your room on the badi site and find a long-term tenant that meets your requirements.